Helpful Videos


Welcome to our video resources: this page holds a range of videos to remind you of the technique for some remedial exercises we use.

Click on the relevant body part on the right to jump to your exercise section
or simply scroll down to see them all!
Body Map


body-part-headbody-part-torsobody-part-pelvisbody-part-legs-and-feet

Head, Neck & Shoulders

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Rotator Cuff Strengthening – Subscapularis



The rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder provide stability and enable smooth movement in all planes. This video shows how to rehab one of the most common muscles to get injured – the internal rotator Subscapularis, with some tips on technique.

Upper and Mid Back

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Mobilising your Thoracic Spine



This is great for people who have stiffness in their mid-back area. Classic signs are having trouble turning to look over their shoulder or leaning back to look up (often comes with lower back pain).
How to Sit Well – for Neck & Shoulder Pain


Lower Back, Glutes and Pelvis

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Activating Glutes, Stretching Hip Flexors



James Dunne of Kinetic Revolution is a fabulous resource for all you runners out there, but the principles of his work apply to any-body (honestly) and I find this one of his most helpful videos for those with back pain and weak gluteal (bottom) muscles.
How to Do the Clam Exercise

Strengthening Gluteus Medius



Gluteus Medius is one of the hip stabilising muscles. Really this exercise will be activating the whole group. Though this chap says the ‘clam’ exercise is ‘relatively ineffective’ I’m confident that it is in many cases an essential first step to hip activation and strength before stepping the challenge up a notch to this exercise. This is a really great video to help make the right muscles work in more functional positions, i.e. in standing.
Strengthening your Hip Abductors

Glutes for Low Back Pain


More Challenging Glute Activation


Another one from a brilliant blog by James Dunne of Kinetic Revolution – this is a nice step up in challenge from the video above, starting to load your glutes with bodyweight. The knee pulled up to your chest should be held tight – it’s designed to prevent you arching your lower back during the movement, stabilise your pelvis and consequently focus all the effort onto your glutes. If you feel your hamstrings cramping, just move your foot a little further away from your body, and remember to activate your bottom muscles before raising your hips up.
Single Leg Squat for Glutes

Activating Your Pelvic Floor


Legs & Feet

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Techniques for Tennis Ball Self Massage



Tennis balls are a brilliant tool to keep chipping away at tight areas between physio sessions with self massage and trigger pointing. These techniques can be used almost anywhere in the body, just follow your physio’s instructions.
Foot Strength and Flexibility



Lack of flexibility and mobility in the feet can have significant consequences further up the body – through the knees, hips, and even back. This video shows the kind of mobility that we are aiming for.

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